Just some relational thoughts about natural gas

Just playing-around with Venn Diagrams. However what’s missing is

  • Natural gas (methane gas) process burning flares for both Methanol and LNG facility;
  • Things that fly in the sky (birds) near a natural gas (methanol gas) burning flare(s);
  • Truck and road traffic impact;
  • People that are close by to the facilities.

However, it’s the relational thought to visualize.

Tacoma: LNG: Methanol: Sour-Gas Supply

To: mailto: Tacoma.methanol.sepa@cityoftacoma.org

Sunday, February 7, 2016

EIS Scoping Comments: Tacoma Manufacturing and Marine Export Facility (TMMEF): “Proposed Methanol Plant”: SEPA Lead Agency: City of Tacoma (File No. SEPA2015-40000260025).

My comment applies to SEPA and this Environmental impact statement (“EIS”) related to the natural gas supply feeding the Methanol Facility.

Given, we are able to determine that the natural gas feeding the Tacoma Methanol Facility will be towards the sour gas spectrum because this same gas distribution piping supply system is proposed also feeding the Tacoma LNG Facility. Therefore:

2.2.1.2 Natural Gas Delivery and Pretreatment Systems

Natural gas would be delivered by a distribution pipeline and metered before it enters the Tacoma LNG Facility. Natural gas, upon delivery and prior to conversion to LNG, must be conditioned. This entails the removal of any constituents other than pure methane. These constituents could include ethane, propane, butane, and other heavy – end hydrocarbons, as well as minor quantities of nitrogen, carbon dioxide, sulfur compounds, and water. The pretreatment system would consist of amine gas treating and regeneration, a gas dehydration system, outlet gas filtration, and an intermediate heat transfer fluid system. As part of the pretreatment process, carbon dioxide and sulfur compounds removed from the natural gas would be flared through a ground flare system described in Section 2.2.1.7 (Other Process Facilities). Heavy hydrocarbons are used as fuel gas to the maximum extent possible, also described in Section 2.2.1.7. When operating conditions are such that all of the heavy hydrocarbons are not used as fuel gas, the components are sent to a holding tank. Periodically, this holding tank would be emptied and its contents transferred to a truck and taken off site for disposal or sale to a third party for use as fuel. See, PSE DEIS Chapter 2 Description of Proposed Action.pdf (at 2.3), http://cms.cityoftacoma.org/planning/pse/PSE%20DEIS%20Chapter%202%20Description%20of%20Proposed%20Action.pdf (last visited Feb 7, 2016)

As a result, it is known that Tacoma LNG Facility the gas has stuff within gas supply that must be removed prior to conversion process, but this cleaning of gas indicates this is sour-natural gas and “Sour gas is a natural gas that contains significant amounts of hydrogen sulphide (H2S). It is extremely poisonous to humans and animals even in small quantities, corrosive, flammable and smells like rotten eggs.” Also, people have been evacuated to safe areas because of sour gas release into environment. See, All About Sour Gas The Huffington Post, http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/06/20/sour-gas-hydrogen-sulphide-hs2_n_3473666.html (last visited Feb 7, 2016)

My comment: Two comments, two environmental EIS issues: 1) If Methanol Facility incoming natural gas (methane gas) piping distribution system develops leaks and if this gas is sour gas; as a result, will there be sufficient H2S (hydrogen sulphide) content to cause environment hazard to community (people) from this escaping gas—once smelled then becomes just odorless—killer gas; therefore, human health environmental risk; 2) Sour gas is more corrosives; therefore, requires special materials to withstand H2S gas caused materials and piping failures; therefore, gas containment materials environmental risk that requires necessary materials to contain sour gas and protect my Tacoma Community. See generally, Hydrogen Damage – Metallic Corrosion, http://www.azom.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=104 (last visited Feb 7, 2016).

John Sherman

4601 N 26th St

Tacoma, WA 98407-4605

Email: jmjsherman@gmail.com

Johnesherman.com

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Tacoma Methanol Facility: Methane to Burn

To: Tacoma.methanol.sepa@cityoftacoma.org

Saturday, February 6, 2016

EIS Scoping Comments: Tacoma Manufacturing and Marine Export Facility (TMMEF): “Proposed Methanol Plant”: SEPA Lead Agency: City of Tacoma (File No. SEPA2015-40000260025).

My comment applies to methane-to-methanol conversion process and combustion airborne inventory added—Methanol facility: “The applicant has stated 70% of natural gas will be converted to methanol, while the remainder will be combusted to produce energy for the chemical processes. Emissions associated with this combustion process will need to be disclosed.” See, Methanol EIS Draft Scope of Work 02052016.pdf (p. 5:n.8), http://cms.cityoftacoma.org/planning/Methanol%20Plant/Methanol%20EIS%20Draft%20Scope%20of%20Work%2002052016.pdf (last visited Feb 6, 2016).

In this case, we see “According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration ( EIA ) , . . . With about 100 cubic feet of natural gas needed to produce one gallon of methanol, . . .” See accord, Methanol: The Clear Alternative for Transportation – Methanol-Flexible-Fuel-Vehicles.aspx Methanol Institute, http://www.methanol.org/Energy/Resources/Alternative-Fuel/Methanol-Flexible-Fuel-Vehicles.aspx (last visited Feb 6, 2016).

Therefore, “One metric ton of methanol (2,204.62 lbs) = Approximately 333 U.S. gallons.” See, SCC – Southern Chemical Corporation » Methanol FAQ’s Southern Chemical Corporation, http://www.southernchemical.com/wp/safety-environment/frequently-asked-questions (last visited Feb 6, 2016).

As a result, My factoring, I find: (7.3-million metric tons / 333gallons) * 100-cubic feet natural gas = 2.2-million cubic feet of natural gas required with 70% conversion process; as a result, 0.9-million cubic feet of natural gas is burned or combusted and added to the airborne combustion byproducts inventory. (See, Tacoma “Draft”, Supra, P 2:n. 4).

My comment is this: With 1-million cubic feet natural gas (methane) combusted (burned) and added to Tacoma Community airborne chemical inventory; as a result, how does that compare with the average Tacoma homeowner using natural gas for heating and cooking with their airborne chemical inventory contribution? We have yet to be informed: will the Methanol facility consume “sweet- or sour-natural gas (methane)” because the amount of chemicals entrained within the natural gas stream is more with “sour-natural gas (methane)” and must be cleaned and the residue from cleaning sour-natural gas (methane)’ must go somewhere?

This “Draft” (Feb. 5, 2016) presents “[T]he EIS will not be designed to disclose every molecule of impact or capture every emission. That is an inefficient use of resources. . . .” (Supra, “Draft” p. 4). I disagree because if you are a person that is harmed by a fugitive Methanol Facility chemical molecule then a harm is a actual harm. See also, Soot Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Soot&oldid=702882659 (last visited Feb 6, 2016). Therefore I would suggest you don’t list the human health harm details but list every chemical molecule that will be fugitive from the Tacoma Methanol Facility processes. Just list all chemicals that will become introduced into the Tacoma Community airborne inventory caused by Methanol Facility!

 

Motorcycle: Falls Over: Why?

Just riding along slow

It follows, slow speed riding a two-wheel motorcycle can be difficult; so, the bike wants to fall over and rest on its side. That is not the intent of keeping two-wheels down and bike under controlled riding at slow speed. There exists a number of great riding instruction articles available; for example, see generally, Slow Speed Maneuvers – Back to Basics, (good pointers to keep in-in-mind while riding along) http://www.ridemyown.com/articles/riding/BTB-slowspeed.shtml (last visited Feb 1, 2016)

How it’s done

I think this, three concepts that contribute to the motorcycle desire to fall-over and rest on the ground: 1) the motorcycle upper parts and weight must always be over the lower wheels for supporting the bike upright; 2) motorcycle handlebars control the direction front wheel is pointed and the direction front wheel travels toward, so front wheel pointed direction and speed of motorcycle will determine how slow- or how-fast the front wheel can relocate its position underneath the upper bike frame and support the bike weight balanced; 3) as a result, as the upper part of the bike leans over, to stop the lean, point the front tire in the leaning direction and all enough bike speed to move the front tire under the upper part of the leaned bike; as a result, the leaning bike lean will be slowed then stopped.

Also, be careful with both steering and throttle control inputs because with the bike leaning towards one direction but over applied steering or twists-of-the-wrist (throttle) control might cause the bike to lean towards the other side or just not move the front wheel under the upper part of the bike fast enough to compensate for the speed of the bike lean and its fall over. Therefore, practice “throttle” and “handlebars” controls until this is engrained into your unconcise physical control reactions.

Where to practice

Specifically, all your motorcycle practices must be done in large open hard surfaced parking lots or areas, free of cars and other obstructions, and wearing your best fall-protection garments and helmet because falls of bike and rider is likely while learning.

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Tacoma: Flares: LNG: Methanol: Birds: Not good

Birds fly into and out of Port of Tacoma Area

But, now comes the proposed LNG and Methanol facility(s) to be constructed and operated with flame flare systems for gasses and vapors; it follows, this is just not a good mix with birds flying around or near facility flare burning environmental hazards,

I had to submit my comment to Tacoma EIS Methanol facility

 

My Comments: “Proposed Methanol Plant”: SEPA File No. SEPA2015-40000260025: Environment: Killing of Birds, (file:ms20160130a.pdf), (Jan. 30, 2016), (Submitted to Tacoma SEPA EIA 1/30/2016), online at http://bit.ly/20dCgKg (visited Jan. 30, 2016)

So, the birds of Tacoma Community need environmental consideration also, even if they are just flying-through and stopping only for a short visit nearby in Port of Tacoma areas, but it should not become their death.

I was not aware of a book until today at the Pt Defiance Boathouse shop: on the shelf, was ‘Seattle Audubon Nature Shop – Birding Destinations – Birds of Vashon 2nd Ed.’ [accessed 30 January 2016]; as a result, I am wondering if the birds might fly (the bird flight-path) between Vashon and Port of Tacoma bird natural habitat? This bird path might cross the Methanol and LNG lands plot areas? Just something else to consider when doing a for-real with fact environmental study: community and all hazards considered.

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Tacoma Methanol SEPA EIS: My Review

I must understand the process first

The Washington State Environmental Policy Act (“SEPA”) and the Environmental Impact Statement (“EIS”) are just a little difficult to grasp for Tacoma Community People’s resulting benefits received back from these review process(s)–SEPA and EIS?

We will never know what difference any public comments made to influence the Tacoma Methanol Plant SEPA EIS process; unless we–the public–are allowed to read all of them.

I’m still not sure I understand the benefit of these public comments submitted. Seems-to-me the SEPA EIS decision makers have the final say as just what is necessary for our Tacoma Community SEPA EIS study finding. See, John Sherman, How It Works: Tacoma Methanol Plant Environmental Impact Stuff (Jan. 26, 2016) (revised, footnote ed., added content), (WordPress pdf file t20160126a) online at https://johnesherman.files.wordpress.com/2016/01/t20160126a2.pdf (visited Jan. 26, 2016).

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Published Jan. 26, 2016 : Revised ed. :: 0705 PST

Industry: Chemicals: Community Knows What When?

Communities have potential hazards, people must know

in my community, Tacoma Wash., under review is a methane-to-methanol industrial plant proposed to be constructed here then operated and it will become the biggest methane-to-methanol operating plant in the world once built and processing methane (natural gas).

Likewise, I have an interest in the potential people hazards to me and other people within my Tacoma Community. Therefore, I must promote the U.S. EPA to do its environmental hazards review for my Community and all other U.S. Communities; as a result, publish all hazards discovered to all people within every effected Community. No exceptions.

See, John Sherman, Hazards: Chemicals: Who Will You Tell Just Wehn? Why?, (Jan. 23, 2016) (pdf document) online at https://johnesherman.files.wordpress.com/2016/01/t20160123a.pdf or http://bit.ly/1OFf13n (visited Jan. 23, 2016).

let’s hope that the U.S. EPA does take an active environmental review of the proposed methane-to-methanol plant operating hazards and publishes each hazard discovered as discovered.

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Published Jan. 23, 2016:1030 PST

I think I have EPA: EPCRA standing because

Let me think of the reasons

First, I must have a direct interest, or affected by potential for future injury, future harm created by operating Port of Tacoma Washington methane-to-methanol plant. I need have conditions that I might be adversely affected in future years, as also others within my Community; Just thinking, I think I do. I think I have the necessary interest and standing for my thinking of future actual harm to me and my Community.

See, John Sherman, Do I Have Standing U.S. EPA: EPCRA Considers What for Who?, (Jan. 21, 2016) (wordpress pdf document), online at https://johnesherman.files.wordpress.com/2016/01/t20160121a.pdf (visited Jan. 21, 2016).

Question: Tacoma City involvement

I question, conflict-of-community people(s) interests as Tacoma City Government is involved with the environmental review process for all hazards that will become present within Port of Tacoma if the methane-to-methanol plant is constructed and operating? Constructed and operated by private, not public, business venture.

Let’s hope the U.S. EPA and its EPCRA does a good job

The Community Right-to-Know Act policy intent, I believe, is to protect—people, lives, air, water, community, and absent living in fear and promoting a better environment tomorrow than today.

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Published Jan. 21, 2016 : 1340 PST