Tacoma: LNG: Methanol: Sour-Gas Supply

To: mailto: Tacoma.methanol.sepa@cityoftacoma.org

Sunday, February 7, 2016

EIS Scoping Comments: Tacoma Manufacturing and Marine Export Facility (TMMEF): “Proposed Methanol Plant”: SEPA Lead Agency: City of Tacoma (File No. SEPA2015-40000260025).

My comment applies to SEPA and this Environmental impact statement (“EIS”) related to the natural gas supply feeding the Methanol Facility.

Given, we are able to determine that the natural gas feeding the Tacoma Methanol Facility will be towards the sour gas spectrum because this same gas distribution piping supply system is proposed also feeding the Tacoma LNG Facility. Therefore:

2.2.1.2 Natural Gas Delivery and Pretreatment Systems

Natural gas would be delivered by a distribution pipeline and metered before it enters the Tacoma LNG Facility. Natural gas, upon delivery and prior to conversion to LNG, must be conditioned. This entails the removal of any constituents other than pure methane. These constituents could include ethane, propane, butane, and other heavy – end hydrocarbons, as well as minor quantities of nitrogen, carbon dioxide, sulfur compounds, and water. The pretreatment system would consist of amine gas treating and regeneration, a gas dehydration system, outlet gas filtration, and an intermediate heat transfer fluid system. As part of the pretreatment process, carbon dioxide and sulfur compounds removed from the natural gas would be flared through a ground flare system described in Section 2.2.1.7 (Other Process Facilities). Heavy hydrocarbons are used as fuel gas to the maximum extent possible, also described in Section 2.2.1.7. When operating conditions are such that all of the heavy hydrocarbons are not used as fuel gas, the components are sent to a holding tank. Periodically, this holding tank would be emptied and its contents transferred to a truck and taken off site for disposal or sale to a third party for use as fuel. See, PSE DEIS Chapter 2 Description of Proposed Action.pdf (at 2.3), http://cms.cityoftacoma.org/planning/pse/PSE%20DEIS%20Chapter%202%20Description%20of%20Proposed%20Action.pdf (last visited Feb 7, 2016)

As a result, it is known that Tacoma LNG Facility the gas has stuff within gas supply that must be removed prior to conversion process, but this cleaning of gas indicates this is sour-natural gas and “Sour gas is a natural gas that contains significant amounts of hydrogen sulphide (H2S). It is extremely poisonous to humans and animals even in small quantities, corrosive, flammable and smells like rotten eggs.” Also, people have been evacuated to safe areas because of sour gas release into environment. See, All About Sour Gas The Huffington Post, http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/06/20/sour-gas-hydrogen-sulphide-hs2_n_3473666.html (last visited Feb 7, 2016)

My comment: Two comments, two environmental EIS issues: 1) If Methanol Facility incoming natural gas (methane gas) piping distribution system develops leaks and if this gas is sour gas; as a result, will there be sufficient H2S (hydrogen sulphide) content to cause environment hazard to community (people) from this escaping gas—once smelled then becomes just odorless—killer gas; therefore, human health environmental risk; 2) Sour gas is more corrosives; therefore, requires special materials to withstand H2S gas caused materials and piping failures; therefore, gas containment materials environmental risk that requires necessary materials to contain sour gas and protect my Tacoma Community. See generally, Hydrogen Damage – Metallic Corrosion, http://www.azom.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=104 (last visited Feb 7, 2016).

John Sherman

4601 N 26th St

Tacoma, WA 98407-4605

Email: jmjsherman@gmail.com

Johnesherman.com

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